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How to Make This Your Last Miserable Tax Season

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Face it, tax pros are used to the exhaustion of long hours thanks to workload compression, staff shortages, frequent changes in tax law, and automation challenges. But Covid made “tax season” a multi-year blur of exhaustion. Geni Whitehouse, CPA, CITP doesn't believe it needs to be this way any longer, today's technology has the answer.

Feb 22nd 2022
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Today’s tax practitioners are burned out like never before and their services continue to be seen as commodities by most of their clients.

Tax season was bad enough before the pandemic. It has always been a siloed practice area within traditional CPA firms and required preparers to rely on workpaper tools designed primarily for auditors.

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For firms focused on compliance, tax work begins at the end of the year when accountants reach out for volumes of details from clients. They collect trial balances and the requisite supporting details.  They may do tax projections before year-end, but the real work happens from January to April (and continues through much of the year thanks to extensions.) As a result, both tax professionals and their clients anticipate the beginning of each year with dread.

Covid Crunch    

Members of the tax department are used to the exhaustion of long hours thanks to workload compression, staff shortages, frequent changes in tax law, and automation challenges. But Covid made “tax season” a multi-year blur of exhaustion. Tax professionals took the lead in applying many of the Covid relief provisions on behalf of their clients. While critical to the life of many businesses, these relief provisions were released without details from either federal or state authorities.

And while clients were trying to figure out how to stay afloat, applications, qualifications, and deadlines changed daily. Tax treatment rules changed as well.  Then there were the forgiveness provisions. Payroll information was needed, credits had to be claimed and on and on. 

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