Work, Home, Life: The new B-School Curricula

Look out Martha Stewart! Sure - business schools still stress economics (remember supply and demand?), finance and basic accounting, but it's a whole new world for enrollees in today's business programs.

Schools across the nation, including the Wharton School of Business, have added classes on personal work, life and time management to their prestigous curriculum. The reason is due to the changing landscape of the typical college student, who now mix work and family matters concurrently with their degree programs.

As a result of taking classes like these, the hope is that employees will be more sensitive, too, to the life and work concerns of their staff.

Students already are sharing a variety of stories on how topics in human resources have helped them realize how important the "person" is to the job function, rather than the other way around.

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