Khloe Kardashian, Wyclef Jean, Lena Olin share tax authorities' spotlight

Khloe Kardashian is a star in Hollywood, but with tax authorities…not so much. On July 28th the California Franchise Tax Board filed a tax lien against Kardashian in the amount of nearly $18,500 relating to income from 2007.

Here's how that total breaks down: $12,891 in back taxes, $3,222 in penalties, $2,143 in interest, and a collection fee of $233.
 
When the tax liability was generated in 2007, Kardashian was 23 years old and starring in Keeping Up with the Kardashians. She is still on the show today, and also is part owner of a luxury clothing boutique in Calabasas, California, called D-A-S-H. She is married to Lamar Odom of the Los Angeles Lakers.
 
So what happened?
 
Kardashian paid the lien previously, but her accountant didn’t send the money to the tax authorities, according to her representatives. She now has replaced that accountant and is waiting for her name to be cleared by the state of California.
 
Alias star Lena Olin might be wishing she had a viable alias. The Academy Award nominee was hit with an Internal Revenue Service lien in the amount of $207,836. The lien is against Olin and her husband, director Lasse Hallstrom. It was filed on July 1 with the Los Angeles County Recorder.
 
In addition to being nominated for Best Supporting Actress in Enemies: a Love Story, she also appeared in Chocolat and Romeo Is Bleeding.
 
Musician Wyclef Jean, nee Nel Wyclef Jean, owes the IRS more than $2.1 million relating to tax years 2006, 2007, and 2008.
 
In May 2010, an IRS lien was filed against him for $724,332 in the Bergen County, New Jersey County Clerk’s Office. That was on top of a lien filed in July 2009 for $599,167, and a lien from July 2007 for $792,269.
 
Jean, wife Claudinette, and his family live in a mansion purchased in 1998 for $1.85 million in upscale Saddle River, New Jersey.
 
Jean was in the news just a few months ago when The Smoking Gun reported his Haitian relief charitable foundation, Yele Haiti, was under the microscope for questionable finances.  Not only did he file tax returns late, but he also used foundation funds to pay himself and his business partner/cousin $410,000.
 
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