There's No "I" In T-E-A-M

Developing a team that works well together can boost productivity and overcome personality conflicts. Keep these points in mind as you lead your “team” into victory.

If Johnny’s getting on your nerves, take a break. Remember, no one is perfect and you just may be getting on Johnny’s nerves, too! Give each other space to be individuals within the team. Also, cut people slack for having an “off” day.

You are on the same team. Each person on your team is working toward the same goal you are – completion of a project. Work together to make sure the project is the focus – not petty differences.

Work teams don’t equal play teams. A team that works together doesn’t necessarily play together. Productive teams can be professional without getting social. Don’t fall into the trap of thinking your teammates also have to be your “buddies.”

Plan to win! A team that fails to plan is a team that plans to fail. Just because you all are working together doesn’t mean that the modus operandi should be “go with the flow.” Make sure each person understands the scope of the project and the individual responsibilities involved.

Celebrate! Once the project has begun, ensure that you make spot checks on each team member’s progress. Celebrate victories along the way.

Upcoming CPE Webinars

Jul 31
In this session Excel expert David Ringstrom helps beginners get up to speed in Microsoft Excel. However, even experienced Excel users will learn some new tricks, particularly when David discusses under-utilized aspects of Excel.
Aug 5
This webcast will focus on accounting and disclosure policies for various types of consolidations and business combinations.
Aug 20
In this session we'll review best practices for how to generate interest in your firm’s services.
Aug 21
Meet budgets and client expectations using project management skills geared toward the unique challenges faced by CPAs. Kristen Rampe will share how knowing the keys to structuring and executing a successful project can make the difference between success and repeated failures.