Texans Favor Internet Tax

The great state of Texas has spoken. A new telephone poll of 1,000 residents confirms that 54 percent of respondents favored taxing goods and services at the same rate as those found in traditional venues.

The poll, conducted by Scripps Howard, also found that 32 percent opposed the Internet sales tax (14 percent rode the fence).

The results have changed since previous polls in which prior surveys found that respondents were fairly split on their opinions regarding the special tax.

Texans who did not use the Internet were much more positive about taxing purchases. Republicans felt the same way in liking the tax a bit less than Democrats.

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