Treadway Commission Committee Unveils Web site

The Committee of Sponsoring Organizations (COSO) of the Treadway Commission has just opened its new Web site at www.coso.org.

The site is designed to assist internal auditors by running articles and information on topics of interest, including the new report, Internal Control - Integrated Framework.

COSO is a 15-year-old organization dedicated to improving the quality of internal controls and related systems by the National Commission on Fraudulent Financial Reporting, otherwise known as the Treadway Commission. Although the Commission's original report was published in 1987, it still is being used today in a variety of scenarios.

Although COSO keeps a low profile, it includes representatives from well-known accounting groups, including the American Accounting Association, AICPA, the Financial Executives Institute, the Institute of Internal Auditors and the Institute of Management Accountants.

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