Technology Brings Changes to Job Applicant Etiquette

The question of whether or not to send a thank-you note after a job interview has been an age-old debate for decades. However, with the advent of email in the workplace in the 1990s, another option has been added for job seekers.

According to a recent Monster.com poll, 60 percent of job seekers send thank-you notes after job interviews (41 percent indicated that they send a traditional letter, while only 19 percent said that they use email). On the MonsterTRAK poll, 64 percent of the college and young alumni job seekers send thank-you notes (38 percent mail their thank-you letters the traditional way, while 26 percent email them).

Conversely, 65 percent of employers expect a thank-you note of some kind (36 percent indicated that they actually prefer thank you notes sent by email, surpassing the 29 percent who would rather receive the traditional letter variety).

"Regardless of the current economic environment, sending a thank-you note after a job interview can be instrumental in securing employment or that dream job. By sending a thank-you note, job seekers are showing the interviewer common courtesy and respect, and appreciation of his/her time," said Marcel Legrand, senior vice president of product, Monster. "These recent polls demonstrate that a majority of employers expect a thank-you note of some form. Job seekers should use it as an opportunity to reiterate interest in the position and his/her qualifications."


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