Microsoft Scores Small Victory in Latest Case Update

On Tuesday, Microsoft counted its blessings. The Supreme Court decided it did not want to hear the software company's appeal in the antitrust ruling, and so instead the case will be sent to a lower court, the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C.

This is considered a victory for Microsoft because the same court has ruled in favor of the company in several other cases prior to this one; the company feel there is a good chance that a decision on the appeal of the original ruling may be in their favor. The decision also means that it will be years before the case is concluded.

Although this court choice is considered good news, President and Chief Executive Steve Ballmer commented that the decision was 'just a small procedural step,' and that the company would have been glad to have argued the case before any court.

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