Hypertag Technology to Link Mobile Phones to Websites

The next generation of wireless devices will give new meaning to the old game of tag—Hypertag that is.
Technology due to be launched this month in London will allow movie-goers to point and click their cell phones at a poster in a movie theater and be directed to the movie’s website. The applications for this type of technology are quite interesting.

Developed by Hypertag, a United Kingdom company, Wired News reports that the small battery-powered electronic tags use infrared signals to communicate web links to cell phones. The smart tags can be applied to any surface, including billboards and walls. Users download software to make use of the technology.

In the movie example, users can also download music from the movie, the promotional trailer and can help find the nearest theater showing the movie.

"This imaginative use of communications technology has scope across a wide range of possible applications, from purely commercial to broad social benefits such as education," said Joe Meaney at the National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts, which awarded a grant to Hypertag earlier this year to develop the technology.
Another possible use of Hypertag technology is in museums and galleries where visitors can download information about the exhibits.

The Hypertag system also allows customization to each user since it is able to tell where the user is located.
"Furthermore, you can place tags close together, so a user can select between several different pieces of content in one location," said Jonathan Morgan, CEO of Hypertag. "At the moment we use infrared because a lot of handsets have this technology; in the future we will be able to use Bluetooth and other tagging technologies."

Morgan added, “It's all about linking wireless devices to content.”

Editor's Note: Think of the potential - at the next networking event you go to all you'll have to do is aim your cell phone at a person you don't know and you can access their Web site, find out their specialties, download their bio, and send them an e-mail. Of course, you can always still do the old fashioned thing and go over and just say, "Hello."


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