Screaming IRS agent goes to jail | AccountingWEB

Screaming IRS agent goes to jail

Few things are certain in this life.  As the saying goes, you know that one thing you can count on is that we all have to die eventually. And the second thing is, we all have to pay our taxes, if not now, then later and with penalties and interest.   Here’s a third rule to live by: it is never a good idea to scream death threats at federal agents. And if you do, chances are it won’t help to say you are sorry.  Ask 49-year-old Albert Bront, of Valencia, California who in now sitting in jail. But wait... the story gets worse. 

Bront, who was being investigated by the federal government for filing false tax returns, is himself an IRS agent. When officials from the United States Department of the Treasury approached his home to serve him with a warrant, Bront screamed at them, “I’m going to kill you all!” Then he tried to rush back into his house, where agents later found loaded weapons.   
 
Official reports said that when Bront tried to go back into the house, the federal  agents felt threatened. One agent drew a gun on him, and another pulled out his baton before making the arrest.   A search of the home revealed that Bront had three loaded guns including a .25 caliber semi-automatic pistol with 115 rounds of ammunition, and a pair of .357 caliber revolvers.
 
According to an affidavit filed concerning this incident:
 “Around the time that Bront made the threat, he was very aggressive, tried to re-enter the house and kept moving toward (an Agent) in an attempt to enter the house, which contained guns. After Bront was arrested, he remained agitated, and when placed in the backseat of a law-enforcement vehicle for transportation, Bront kicked the front seat, pounded the passenger door with his elbow and continued yelling.”
 
The affidavit also stated that Bront subsequently told investigators that his threats were  angry outbursts and  he did not mean actual harm to the agents. He is being held without bail, awaiting a preliminary trial in the U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, on July 28th.   
 
So far Bront has not been charged in connection with the initial investigation for the filing of false tax returns.

Officials at the Treasury Department would not comment on the specifics of the case or on Bront’s role as an employee of the Internal Revenue Service.

 

Wait, there's more!
There's always more at AccountingWEB. We're an active community of financial professionals and journalists who strive to bring you valuable content every day. If you'd like, let us know your interests and we'll send you a few articles every week either in taxation, practice excellence, or just our most popular stories from that week. It's free to sign up and to be a part of our community.
Premium content is currently locked

Editor's Choice

WHAT KIND OF FIRM ARE YOU?
As part of our continued effort to provide valuable resources and insight to our subscribers, we're conducting this brief survey to learn more about your personal experiences in the accounting profession. We will be giving away five $50 Amazon gift cards, and a $250 Amazon gift card to one lucky participant.
This is strictly for internal use and data will not be sold
or shared with any third parties.