Screaming IRS agent goes to jail

Few things are certain in this life.  As the saying goes, you know that one thing you can count on is that we all have to die eventually. And the second thing is, we all have to pay our taxes, if not now, then later and with penalties and interest.   Here’s a third rule to live by: it is never a good idea to scream death threats at federal agents. And if you do, chances are it won’t help to say you are sorry.  Ask 49-year-old Albert Bront, of Valencia, California who in now sitting in jail. But wait... the story gets worse. 

Bront, who was being investigated by the federal government for filing false tax returns, is himself an IRS agent. When officials from the United States Department of the Treasury approached his home to serve him with a warrant, Bront screamed at them, “I’m going to kill you all!” Then he tried to rush back into his house, where agents later found loaded weapons.   
 
Official reports said that when Bront tried to go back into the house, the federal  agents felt threatened. One agent drew a gun on him, and another pulled out his baton before making the arrest.   A search of the home revealed that Bront had three loaded guns including a .25 caliber semi-automatic pistol with 115 rounds of ammunition, and a pair of .357 caliber revolvers.
 
According to an affidavit filed concerning this incident:
 “Around the time that Bront made the threat, he was very aggressive, tried to re-enter the house and kept moving toward (an Agent) in an attempt to enter the house, which contained guns. After Bront was arrested, he remained agitated, and when placed in the backseat of a law-enforcement vehicle for transportation, Bront kicked the front seat, pounded the passenger door with his elbow and continued yelling.”
 
The affidavit also stated that Bront subsequently told investigators that his threats were  angry outbursts and  he did not mean actual harm to the agents. He is being held without bail, awaiting a preliminary trial in the U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, on July 28th.   
 
So far Bront has not been charged in connection with the initial investigation for the filing of false tax returns.

Officials at the Treasury Department would not comment on the specifics of the case or on Bront’s role as an employee of the Internal Revenue Service.

 

You may like these other stories...

As anyone who's ever been through a divorce can attest, the pain of parting with your spouse isn't just emotional—the fallout from divorce can wreak financial havoc as well long after the dust in the courtroom...
Former DOJ Tax Division head Kathryn Keneally joining DLA Piper in New YorkGlobal law firm DLA Piper announced on Thursday that Kathryn Keneally, the former head of the US Justice Department Tax Division, is joining the firm...
OECD calls for coordinated fight against corporate tax avoidanceDavid Jolly of the New York Times reported that dozens of countries with the most advanced economies have agreed on principles for concrete action to prevent...

Already a member? log in here.

Upcoming CPE Webinars

Sep 24
In this jam-packed presentation Excel expert David Ringstrom, CPA will give you a crash-course in creating spreadsheet-based dashboards. A dashboard condenses large amounts of data into a compact space, yet enables the end user to easily drill down into details when warranted.
Sep 30
This webcast will include discussions of important issues in SSARS No. 19 and the current status of proposed changes by the Accounting and Review Services Committee in these statements.
Oct 21
Kristen Rampe will share how to speak and write more effectively by understanding your own and your audience's communication style.
Oct 23
Amber Setter will show the value of leadership assessments as tools for individual and organizational leadership development initiatives.