Requesting Your Tax Return Information

When requesting tax return information from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), there are several ways for you to receive your information. You can request tax return transcripts and tax account transcripts. You can also receive a copy of your original return, generally if it has been less than seven years since filing.

This information can be obtained by phone or by mail, according to the IRS. The usual fees for transcripts or return copies requested by taxpayers residing in the Presidential Disaster Areas have been waived by the IRS. They may be reconstructing their tax records, need to apply for benefits, or file amended tax returns to claim disaster-related losses.

A Tax Return Transcript shows most line items from your Form 1040, 1040A, or 1040EZ, as it was originally filed. All forms and schedules that you filed with your original tax return will be included. Any changes made by you, your representative, or the IRS, after your tax return was filed are not shown in these transcripts, according to the IRS. A tax return transcript meets most lending institutions’ requirements for mortgage or student loan applications. The usual fee for all transcripts is $3.

A Tax Account Transcript shows a combination of line item information and adjustments made by you or the IRS, after your tax return was filed. This type of transcript provides basic information, such as marital status, type of return filed, adjusted gross income, and taxable income, according to the IRS.

A copy of your original tax return Form 1040, 1040A, and 1040EZ is generally available for seven years from the filing date. The IRS reports the usual fee for return copies is $39.

Call the IRS at 1-800-829-1040 to request your transcripts from a Customer Account Representative. You can also order transcripts by mail, using either Form 4506 for tax return copies, or 4506-T for tax return transcripts. You will need Adobe Reader or Acrobat to view, complete, and print this form.

If you are a taxpayer affected by the hurricanes, write “Hurricane Katrina”, “Hurricane Rita”, or “Hurricane Wilma” in red ink across the top of the printed form before mailing. Mail your Form 4506 or 4506-T to the IRS address listed on the form for your particular area.

IRS Form 4506T, Request for Transcript of Tax Return, and IRS Form 4506, Request for Copy of Tax Return, are available via the Internet. The IRS advises taxpayers to allow two weeks for delivery.

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