Hoosier pays huge tax bill in coins and $1 bills

If you're not from Indiana, you might not have heard of the large property tax increases that were assessed this year in some of the counties. Cary Malchow, a homeowner in Muncie, Indiana is one taxpayer who was affected by the increase, and he decided to make a statement with his tax payment.

In an unusual form of protest, Malchow didn't refuse to pay his bill. Instead, he chose to pay the bill in person, in cash. Lots of cash. He brought $12,656.07 in coins and $1 bills to the Delaware County treasurer's office last week.

It took three cashiers 75 minutes to count the cash, according to Delaware County Treasurer Warren Beebe. Beebe mentioned that other customers had to stand in line, the office had to stay open after normal closing hours, and the office was unable to make its bank deposit before the end of the day, losing $1,135.90 in interest that would have been earned overnight.

Malchow went to two Indiana banks in order to amass the cash needed for the payment. "I did it so people can physically see what $12,000 is," he said. "When you pay in cash, you have a tendency to feel that pain a little more."

Tax protests have been rampant throughout central Indiana this spring and summer since Governor Mitch Daniels ordered property tax increases in four counties.


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