Groundbreaking Tax Fraud Lawsuit against Sprint for over $300 Million

On April 19, 2012, Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman filed a first-of-its-kind lawsuit against Sprint-Nextel Corporation for deliberately under-collecting and underpaying millions of dollars in New York state and local sales taxes on flat-rate access charges for wireless calling plans. Brought under the New York False Claims Act, the Attorney General's lawsuit requires Sprint to pay three times its underpayment of over $100 million, plus penalties if found liable. All of Sprint's major wireless competitors, including Verizon, AT&T, T-Mobile, and MetroPCS, have followed the law regarding these taxes.
 
"By deliberately evading sales taxes, Sprint cost state and local governments over $100 million that could have been used for critical services and much-needed resources that our state and its citizens need given the challenging economic times we are in," said Attorney General Schneiderman. "The message of our office is clear ‒ tax dodging is not acceptable and we will use every tool in our arsenal to make sure that taxpayers' money is protected, and that honest businesses and consumers are not placed at a disadvantage for collecting and paying their fair share of taxes."
 
Since 2002, New York Tax Law has required mobile phone companies to collect and pay sales taxes on the full amount of their monthly access charges for their calling plans. For example, when a customer pays Sprint a fixed monthly charge of $39.99 for 450 minutes of mobile calling time, the law requires Sprint to collect and pay sales taxes on the entire $39.99. According to the Attorney General's complaint, starting in 2005, Sprint illegally failed to collect and pay New York sales taxes on an arbitrarily set portion of its revenue from these fixed monthly access charges. To carry out this plan, Sprint repeatedly and knowingly submitted false records and statements to New York State tax authorities. Sprint concealed this practice from taxing authorities, its competitors, and its customers.
 
Sprint's scheme is ongoing. Sprint did not correct its sales tax practices when it was informed of its illegality, and it has not corrected them even today. As a result of Sprint's unlawful actions, its underpayment of New York sales taxes is growing by about a $210,000 every week, over $30,000 a day.
 
The decision not to collect and pay these taxes arose out of a nationwide effort by Sprint to obtain an advantage over its competitors ‒ not by cutting its prices or offering better service ‒ but by failing to collect and pay sales taxes its competitors properly collected and paid. Right before deciding to underpay its taxes, Sprint concluded that this practice would position its calling plans as cheaper than competitors' plans by $4.6 million per month, collectively, because of sales taxes not collected and paid.
 
The Attorney General's lawsuit is the first-ever tax enforcement action filed under the New York False Claims Act. The Act is one of the state's most powerful civil fraud enforcement tools because it allows whistleblowers and prosecutors to take legal action against companies or individuals that defraud the government. Fraudsters found liable under the False Claims Act must pay triple damages, penalties, and attorneys' fees. Under the False Claims Act, whistleblowers may be eligible to receive up to 25 percent of any money recovered by the government as a result of information they provide.
 
Twenty-nine states and the federal government have passed False Claims Acts, but only New York's Act expressly covers tax fraud as a result of a landmark law authored by Attorney General Schneiderman. In 2011, as one of his first acts in office, Attorney General Schneiderman created the "Taxpayer Protection Bureau," which is charged to work with whistleblowers and enforce the False Claims Act in tax and other government fraud cases.
 
The Office's investigation of Sprint began with a whistleblower lawsuit ‒ also called a "qui tam" action ‒ filed in New York State Supreme Court in Manhattan in March 2011, just after the Taxpayer Protection Bureau was created. The Bureau, working with the New York State Department of Taxation & Finance, then conducted an extensive investigation and determined the extent of Sprint's illegal conduct. By filing the complaint, the Attorney General has taken over the action from the whistleblower on behalf of New York's taxpayers. If found liable, Sprint could be required to pay over $300 million to New York state and local governments, including school districts.
 
The Attorney General's complaint also seeks to protect Sprint's current customers to whom Sprint falsely marketed its wireless calling plans. Sprint promised its customers that it would collect and pay the correct amount of sales taxes on their behalf. The Attorney General seeks to ensure that Sprint ‒ and not its customers ‒ will be liable for any back taxes, and to empower Sprint's current New York customers to terminate their Sprint contracts without having to pay termination fees.
 
Source: April 19 Press Release from the Attorney General 
 
On April 19, 2012, Sprint issued the following statement in response to the New York Attorney General Lawsuit alleging Sprint did not collect the proper New York state taxes from Sprint's New York customers:
 
"This complaint is without merit and Sprint categorically denies the complaint's allegations. We have collected and paid over to New York every penny of sales taxes on mobile wireless services that we believe our customers owe under New York state law. With this lawsuit, the Attorney General's office is claiming New York consumers, who already pay some of the highest wireless taxes in the country, should pay even more. We intend to stand up for New York consumers' rights and fight this suit."
 
Source: April 19 Press Release from Sprint Nextel
 
 

 

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