Election 2000: How are Singles Affected by Tax Issues?

With the presidential election less than two weeks away, it seems that both candidates may have overlooked a significant section of the population - single adults, 25 to 64 years old.

The realization that Governor George W. Bush and Vice President Al Gore are concentrating their tax-break strategies on working families and the elderly became evident during last week's debate in which a young woman asked a question during the town hall meeting pertaining to tax breaks for her demographic set.

Neither candidates respond very well. Gore rattled off statistics aimed at married couples and Bush suggested singles would get tax refunds if his plan were enacted.

The population that makes up this group of singles numbers about 25 million, and according to analysts, members of this group are the ones generally omitted from discussions because some of the higher-profile issues like healthcare coverage for the elderly and educational concerns do not affect them.

It is this group, however, that is more likely to vote than many of the other demographic groups. Married couples with children, as pointed out by the woman who spoke up at the debate, have other priorities, whereas a lot of single people may have the time to go out and vote.


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