2006 Tax Return Filing Deadline Extended to April 17

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has announced that taxpayers across the country will have until Tuesday, April 17, 2007, to file their 2006 returns and pay any taxes that are due.

"This year, taxpayers have additional time to file and pay beyond the traditional April 15 deadline. As we always do, we encourage taxpayers to get an early start on their taxes to make sure they have plenty of time to accurately prepare their return," said IRS Commissioner Mark W. Everson.

Previously, the April 17 deadline only applied to residents of the District of Columbia and six eastern states that are served by the Massachusetts processing facility where Patriots Day will be observed on April 16. This year all the states have until April 17.

The new April 17, 2007, deadline applies to any of the following:

• 2006 federal individual income tax returns, filed on paper or electronically
• Automatic six-month filing extension requests, whether submitted on Form 4868 or electronically
• Tax year 2006 balance due payments, whether made electronically (direct debit or credit card) or by check
• Individual refund claims for tax year 2003, where the regular three-year statute of limitations is expiring
• 2006 tax year contributions to a Roth or traditional IRA
• Individual estimated tax payments for first quarter 2007, whether made electronically or by check

IRS Publication 509, Tax Calendars for 2007, describes other tax filing and payment requirements affected by the change and is available on the IRS web site.

The majority of taxpayers won't have to change their plans because of this announcement because three out of four filers get refunds and those claiming refunds typically file early.

The law is that filing and payment deadlines that fall on a Saturday, Sunday or legal holiday are met on time on the next business day. A decades old federal statute states that holidays observed in the District of Columbia have nationwide impact on tax issues, not just in D.C. But under city legislation that was recently enacted, April 16 is a holiday in the District of Columbia. When officials became aware of the interaction of the national filing date and the local observance of the new Emancipation Day holiday, most of the forms and publications for the current tax session had already gone to print.

Although taxpayers have extra time this year, they can avoid the last-minute rush and possible mistakes by filing early, using the fast and convenient electronic filing and choosing direct deposit of any refunds.

More information on payment options and electronic filing and links to companies that provide these services can be found on the IRS.gov site.

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