Survey Finds Workplaces Will Change After Sept. 11

In the aftermath of the September 11 terrorist attacks, nearly 6,000 human resources professionals were surveyed by the Society for Human Resource Management to discover their reactions to workplace changes that might occur in the future.

Organizations will heighten security in the future, according to 56 percent of those surveyed, and 47 percent feel certain there will be higher expectations of employers to provide security, while 23 percent expect an increase in up-front screening of potential employees.

Nearly 60 percent of survey respondents said their companies were not prepared or only slightly prepared to deal with the aftermath of such a tragedy, however 83 percent said their companies allowed employees to watch television or listen to the radio on the day of the attacks, and 67 percent indicated their company allowed employees to cancel or postpone scheduled business travel.

Half of those surveyed noted that their companies had collected money or supplies as aid to victims of the attacks.

According to survey respondents, 54 percent of companies lack disaster plans.

You can read the complete results of the survey.
 

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