SEC Looks to Hire Psychologist to Boost Employee Morale

Some think employee morale at the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is at a new low in the wake of seemingly endless scandals, long hours for less pay than in the private sector and a series of embarrassments.

To combat stress, burnout and conflict, the SEC is planning to hire an organizational psychologist to boost employee morale. The new, full-time job pays upwards of $147,978 per year and is a two-year appointment with the possibility of an extension.

The SEC seeks a candidate with a degree in psychology with a master’s or doctorate preferred. According to Dow Jones Newswires, the ideal candidate will make recommendations on productivity, team-building and diversity and to develop "innovative solutions to complex psychological issues."

The announcement, which has been sent around the agency by e-mail is considered hilarious by some staffers. Others see it as a waste of money and worry that it could send some staff fleeing to the private sector. The idea of a SEC psychologist is amusing to many.

"Just one?" asked William McLucas, former SEC enforcement division director and now a partner with the Washington, D.C., law firm of Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering. "They should get a couple."