Long term care insurance purchases on the rise | AccountingWEB

Long term care insurance purchases on the rise

Some 400,000 individuals purchased long-term care insurance protection in 2008 according to a just-released report. The overwhelming majority (84%) of individual buyers in 2008 were younger than age 65 and three-fourths (76%) selected a more affordable approach to this protection by opting for coverage for a specific number of years.

The annual study conducted by the American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance, the industry's professional trade organization, analyzed data on 215,000 buyers of individual long-term care insurance protection. According to the organization's research, some 8.2 million Americans now have long-term care insurance protection purchased on an individual basis (typically through an insurance professional) or through a plan offered by their employer.

"Individuals continue to purchase protection at younger ages," explains Jesse Slome, the Association's Executive Director. In 2008, some 53% of individual buyers were between ages 55 and 64; compared to 50% the prior year. Another 24% were between ages 45 and 54 (2008). "The age of buyers keeps dropping as consumers -- especially baby boomers -- understand the cost-saving benefits of locking in good health discounts and ways to make protection more affordable," Slome explains. In 2000, the average age of an individual buying long-term care insurance was 67.

The number of individuals purchasing long-term care insurance protection for a specified number of years also increased according to the Association study. Just over three-fourths (76%) of buyers in 2008 opted for coverage for a claim lasting five years or less; a slight increase over the prior year (71%). "The most expensive long-term care insurance policy is one with an unlimited benefit period (one with no cap on the number of years benefits will be received)," Slome explains. "Consumers are right-sizing their protection taking into account available savings and retirement income. This cost-sharing approach can reduce the cost of protection by 30 percent or more."

Perhaps in recognition of cost-consciousness, consumers were fairly evenly spread in terms of the level of selected daily benefit. Just under one-third (31.5%) opted for a daily benefit between $100 and $149. "In current dollars, that amounts to between $36,500 and $54,385 in a yearly benefit," Slome notes. "But most policies offer an option so benefits keep pace with rising costs and 15 years from now, the value of the (higher) benefit would be $75,800 a year."

The complete findings of the study are published in the 2009 LTCi Sourcebook available from the American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance.

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