Increase Your Newsletter Exposure

Wouldn't it be nice to double, maybe even triple your newsletter audience without increasing your production costs one penny?

You can. And this little tip may just help you reduce your current costs if you've been sending several copies to people in the same company. Unless your newsletter features time sensitive information, this is a great way to get your newsletter passed around.

How? You ask. It's easy. Simply incorporate a routing box on your newsletter. Include six to eight blanks for routing initials and a place where each person can sign off when they have read your newsletter.

You'll be surprised at how effective this technique can be. Why not try it? All you have to lose is exposure!

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Upcoming CPE Webinars

Aug 5
This webcast will focus on accounting and disclosure policies for various types of consolidations and business combinations.
Aug 20
In this session we'll review best practices for how to generate interest in your firm’s services.
Aug 21
Meet budgets and client expectations using project management skills geared toward the unique challenges faced by CPAs. Kristen Rampe will share how knowing the keys to structuring and executing a successful project can make the difference between success and repeated failures.
Aug 28
Excel spreadsheets are often akin to the American Wild West, where users can input anything they want into any worksheet cell. Excel's Data Validation feature allows you to restrict user inputs to selected choices, but there are many nuances to the feature that often trip users up.