Study Reveals Midwest and South Offer Best Work-Life Balance

A study conducted by Tickle Inc., an online career assessment testing company, has found workers in the Northeast fall far below other regions in many key areas of job satisfaction. Survey results show overall job happiness is strongly tied to a healthy work-life balance and strong company leadership. New England falls far below the national average in both categories, while the Midwest and South lead the country in both areas. Tickle's study also found that women maintain a healthier work-life balance than men and are therefore more satisfied in their jobs.

"What we're seeing regarding gender differences in job satisfaction is likely due to a variety of factors," says Tickle Research Psychologist Dr. Jennifer Bruning Brown. "For instance, differing gender role demands and socialization of men and women could result in distinct psychological differences in their motivation to work and in the value they attach to career. Alternatively, women's careers are more often interrupted than men's careers for marriage, childbirth and other family-related issues. When women return to work, they are more likely to pursue part-time employment and therefore may have better balance between their personal lives and their careers. These factors, as well as many others, may contribute to the gender differences we're seeing in overall job satisfaction."

Job satisfaction varies strongly by region and gender

  • 58 percent of respondents say they love what they do for a living
  • Only 43 of men in New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania indicate the same -- more than 13 percent off the national average
  • 63 percent of men in the South love what they do for a living, 5 percent more than the national average.

Work-life balance suffers in New England, strong in Midwest, South and among women

  • Only 50 percent of men in New England feel they maintain a healthy work-life balance, while more than 64 percent of men in the Midwest report the same
  • Women in the South lead the country with 3 out of 4 (75 percent) reporting they maintain a healthy work-life balance
  • Nationally, women are 13 percent more likely to have a healthy work-life balance

Men are happier than women in positions with high status and power, men want to supervise others

  • 47 percent of men feel best when they are in a job with high social status and power, while only 35 percent of women report the same
  • 76 percent of men versus 64 percent of women prefer to have the responsibility of supervising others
  • 51 percent of men report making a lot of money as a high priority in their career, while only 46 percent of women feel the same

Good company benefits and a job they enjoy are universal

  • 90 percent of respondents indicated benefits as very important to their job satisfaction
  • 90 percent also responded it was 'absolutely critical' they enjoy their work and that they want their job to help them grow as an individual

These results are not scientific and are based on a sample of 3,000 Tickle users who chose to participate in this study from September 25, 2004 to October 31, 2004.

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