Ernst & Young Buys Lobbying Firm

Big 5 firm Ernst & Young has stepped into Washington politics by buying the advocacy and lobbying firm Washington Counsel. The firm is managed by a bipartisan group of Capitol Hill lawyers, and is among the top 10 largest lobbying groups in Washington.

Why does E&Y want to own a lobbying arm? The $9 million lobbying firm represents many big name clients, including such giants as Merril Lynch, Ford, Charles Schwab, etc. E&Y can bring its significant international consulting and technology experience to the firms' client base, and can inject an element of technical expertise to the artful world of lobbying.

Washington Council Ernst & Young will represent a quick accounting firm foray into the political world, and will tie in technology and consulting into the world of lobbying.

Stay tuned for more ventures like this . . .

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