A foot in the door: Identifying myths, realities behind temporary work

Temporary work remains a bright spot in the current job market, but many people might think that project assignments aren't available in their industry or at their experience level. To help job seekers separate fact from fiction, temporary financial staffing firm Accountemps has identified five myths commonly associated with temporary work.

"Companies are increasingly turning to interim professionals at all levels to keep pace with rising workloads as they assess whether new staffing needs will be ongoing," said Andrew Denka, executive director of Accountemps. "As a result, temporary work is frequently a common path to full-time employment and an important option for job seekers to explore."
 
Following are five misconceptions about temporary work and the realities behind them:
 
Myth No. 1: Temporary assignments are mainly clerical or lower skilled.
Reality: The fastest growth in the temporary industry is in professional and technical occupations, as both businesses and professionals have realized the benefits of greater flexibility. Companies now hire interim professionals for positions ranging from entry-level accounting clerk to chief financial officer.
 
Myth No. 2: Temporary work can't be included on a résumé.
Reality: Temporary assignments can – and should – be included on a resume. List the staffing firm as your employer and then describe the job duties you have performed for various companies.
 
Myth No. 3: Temporary work will interfere with my search for a permanent position.
Reality: It could actually enhance it. Many businesses view interim engagements as a way to evaluate people for full-time roles and often hire temporary workers they've had an opportunity to observe firsthand. Project work also allows professionals to enhance their skill set and earn an income while continuing their search for a full-time job.
 
Myth No. 4: Temporary work doesn't pay well.
Reality: Temporary and contract positions typically pay on par with salaried ones, and individuals with the most sought-after skills often can command a premium.
 
Myth No. 5: Job seekers will have to pay to work with a staffing firm.
Reality: Respectable staffing firms never charge candidates for their services. All fees are covered by the client companies.
 
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