CFO Magazine: 10 Reasons NOT to Accept That Job

Rising unemployment, eager job candidates, and not-always-above-board business practices sometimes conflict with each other causing confusion and hesitation on the part of job-seekers looking to accept new job positions.

CFO.com's Craig Schneider offers ten tell-tale signs that should cause would-be CFO's to keep walking when they encounter a job situation that may appear "right" for them.

  1. Hidden CFO Histories - receiving a non-answer when you ask about the previous CFO

  2. CFO = "Miracle Worker" - the perception that you can walk on water and solve all the problems of the company

  3. D&O Exclusions - Directors & Owners insurance is expected, but exclusions could lead to past problems

  4. CEO = Dingbat - be sure that you have a good mentor in the position of CEO

  5. Premature recognition - creative accounting takes on all forms; try to determine the level of conservatism by interviewing people on the "front line"

  6. Trial Balance = Doorstop - if the trial balance is over an inch thick, the company may have a really "screwed up" accounting information system

  7. Taxing Experiences - payroll tax issues can be an indication of cash-flow problems

  8. The CEO Stays in The Picture - you should be able to interview with people at all levels of the organization; if the CEO insists on being in on the meeting, take it as a red flag

  9. "Mary works in A/P" - if you hear the receptionists continually paging someone, find out if they work in A/P and find out if they are purposefully dodging phone calls

  10. The Auditors Have a Thing or Two to Say - you can find out an awful lot about the company by having a conversation with their external auditor

Read more examples of each of these tell-tale signs in CFO.com's article, "You Shouldn't Take The Job."


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