Career Networking Tips and Ideas

Networking is a matter of maintaining relationships with people who can assist you in your future professional objectives. These people could be bosses, coworkers, subordinates, competitors or golfing buddies. The following is a short list of tips to assist you in maintaining a viable professional network.

  1. Make a conscious decision of with whom you want to keep in contact for your network. Choose quality over quantity. Don't feel the need to network with people who can't assist in furthering your career.

  2. Remember that every contact you make can be important. It may be difficult to determine how someone you meet today will be able to help you in the future. A quality contact is a quality contact regardless of what they can do for you now. Add this person to your network and see what the future holds.

  3. Use your network to assist others. As you develop your network, you will determine circumstances where you can help someone other than yourself by contacting one of your existing contacts. Do not hesitate to do so. Such actions will speak well for you and strengthen your own contact network.

  4. Don't rely solely on special events to keep you in touch with your contacts. Follow-up with contacts by actively maintaining your relationship. Drop them an e-mail or give them a call to keep them in the loop.

  5. Use tools to maintain your contacts. Don't rely only on your ability to remember names. With the use of e-mail and a simple database no one should ever become disconnected from your network.

  6. Remember that the relationships you establish with your contacts do not have to be friendships. Most of the networking relationships you establish should be based on a mutual interest between yourself and the contact. However, if a friendship does happen, you've gained more than you expected.

  7. Don't delay, start today. If you have not taken the time to create a network or organize your contacts, do so now. Remember that every moment you lose, a potential new contact could be slipping through your fingers.

  8. Be upfront and honest when contacting a member of your network. When asking one of your contacts for assistance, be sincere and straightforward. Don't feel the need to disguise your reasons for making the call.


Power Networking Second Edition: 59 Secrets for Personal & Professional Success, by Donna Fisher, Sandy Vilas

This book teaches the reader powerful secrets to creating personal and professional networks, with a self-assessment quiz to get started and several methods of eliminating the roadblocks on the path to successful networking. More Books

You may like these other stories...

Event Date: August 21, 2014, 2 pm ETMeet budgets and client expectations using project management skills geared toward the unique challenges faced by CPAs.  Kristen Rampe will share how knowing the keys to structuring...
Event Date: August 20, 2014, 2:30 pm ETIn this session we'll review best practices for how to generate interest in your firm’s services. Topics include:Web Based Marketing StrategiesAppointment SettingNetworking...
Recently, there has been a lot of buzz about the future of continuing professional education (CPE). The American Institute of CPAs (AICPA) created a task force on the Future of Learning with an accompanying fancy website. In...

Upcoming CPE Webinars

Jul 31
In this session Excel expert David Ringstrom helps beginners get up to speed in Microsoft Excel. However, even experienced Excel users will learn some new tricks, particularly when David discusses under-utilized aspects of Excel.
Aug 5
This webcast will focus on accounting and disclosure policies for various types of consolidations and business combinations.
Aug 20
In this session we'll review best practices for how to generate interest in your firm’s services.
Aug 21
Meet budgets and client expectations using project management skills geared toward the unique challenges faced by CPAs. Kristen Rampe will share how knowing the keys to structuring and executing a successful project can make the difference between success and repeated failures.