Ten Strategies for Client Retention

by Bea Fields

Traditional marketing strategies encourage business owners to continually grow their businesses by adding new customers. In today's competitive world of business, it is more important than ever to aim for more transactions with existing customers by using the power of customer follow-up and attention to good service.

These ten tips may help you in turning your existing customers into walking billboards for your business.

  1. Spend thirty minutes each day talking with two existing clients. Ask them what they want, what they need, and what they like/don't like. Implement the ideas that work for you.

  2. Invite your champion clients to serve on your Board of Directors. Your clients will add wisdom and will know that you value their judgment.

  3. Post newspaper/magazine articles about your clients' achievements in your establishment. People love to be acknowledged for their wins. A classic picture frame will add an elegant touch.

  4. Invite clients/customers to test a new product or service before you offer it to the public. Your customers will have insight about what the public wants. This will save you energy and will send the message to your client that they are the first to experience something new.

  5. Partner with your clients in a marketing effort, workshop, or special event. The more opportunities you have to spend with your clients, the more you will connect on a personal basis.

  6. Provide value every day. Freebies and discounts are a great way to keep clients and make new ones. A free car wash, hair cut, facial, or gift certificate are always popular. Offer something unique to show your customers that you are creative and open to new ideas.

  7. Follow the successes of companies that have a reputation for outstanding customer service. By learning from the pros, your business will grow and improve.

  8. Connect with your clients on common ground. Find out what you share in common with your clients. They will remember you and develop a sense of friendship.

  9. Spend time with your competition, and know what they are doing. In this competitive world, it is difficult to stay ahead. Design a suggestion box for customers to let you know about better prices and better service.

  10. Remember! Your customers are always right even if they're wrong. Thank your customers for both positive and negative comments. Do all in your power to make them happy .

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