Quality of Life Tips Relocation Scales

Successfully recruiting top executives from another city or region of the country requires more than just a great job offer. According to a recent survey by Robert Half, 31 percent of chief financial officers say that the quality of life in a new city would influence their decision to relocate for a job opportunity. Only 27 percent of those surveyed reported compensation as their primary motivator.


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“Taking a job in a new town is not just a career decision – it’s a lifestyle choice,” Max Messmer, chairman and chief executive officer (CEO) of Robert Half International Inc., and author of Human Resources Kit for Dummies(R) said in a prepared statement. “Companies that highlight the qualities that distinguish their city, such as a reputation for safety, highly regarded school system or cultural events, increase their chances of attracting top professionals.”

When asked “Which one of the following would most influence your decision to relocate to a different city to pursue a better job opportunity?” more than 1,400 CFOs from a stratified random Sample of U.S. companies with 20 or more employees responded:

  • Quality of life in new city – 31 percent
  • Compensation for new position – 27 percent
  • Cost of living in new city – 13 percent
  • Status of new position – 6 percent
  • Distance of move – 5 percent
  • Family considerations – 1 percent
  • Other – 1 percent
  • Would not move – 12 percent
  • Don’t know/no answer – 4 percent

“Employers enhance their ability to secure commitments from prospects by taking steps to ensure a smooth transition for employees, including providing information about housing and assisting with job placement for spouses, if appropriate,” Messmer adds, noting that the survey results indicate that the distance of the move is less important than such factors as compensation and the new city’s cost of living.

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