Microsoft Break-Up Update

Here’s an update to the story released earlier this week on the Microsoft break-up. This time, U.S. states, along with the Justice Department, will urge a Federal judge to split the company into two entities.

The basis for the break-up is to avoid any future holds on a monopoly of power related to software and operating systems. The governments’ proposal calls for the company to be split into one entity that would only manufacture and distribute the operating system (Windows 2000, for example), while the second group would handle everything else, such as the Office 2000 suite.

The hearing is scheduled for May 24, although a final ruling is not expected until later this summer or some time in the fall.

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