Financial Metrics Every Business Owner Should Know

By Mary Ellen Biery, Research Specialist, Sageworks Inc.

 
Is your business successful? How do you know?
 
If you're like most business owners, your days are filled by efforts to make your company successful. Those tasks might be focused on making a great product, generating sales, or building customer relationships. And you might be great at those things. 
 
But how great are you at making money? And how well are you managing your resources? 
 
Talking Points
To reduce the number of days for accounts receivable you can:
  • Monitor accounts receivable on a weekly basis and charge interest on invoices that are past due.
  • Speed up the billing of customers (even three days earlier each month) in order to accelerate the collection process which can significantly improve the firm's cash position.
  • Monitor invoicing procedures to help ensure correctness. Nothing will delay payment more than sending out an incorrect invoice. This will extend accounts receivable and hurt cash flow.
  • Accept multiple forms of payment, such as credit and debit cards, to help cut down on the number of denied payments (bad checks). This helps to ensure that a business is collecting all the money it's owed.

You'll find additional information about accounts receivable on Sageworks' blog.

 
Pre-tax net profit margin. This metric is probably the most important, because it tells you how much profit you're making from every dollar in sales. For private companies, it's usually expressed as net profit before taxes in a given financial period divided by sales.
 
"A higher margin, or higher profitability, is better for a company's profit picture," said Brad Schaefer, an analyst with Sageworks Inc., a financial information company that provides financial analysis and benchmarking applications to accounting firms and private companies. "This number can show you how effective you're being with expenses and if you should decrease certain expenses so that they don't eat up as much of the revenues." 
 
Current ratio and quick ratio. These two metrics are considered fundamental liquidity ratios, or ratios that give an idea of how well you can meet your obligations, and they should generally be analyzed together. "If the business doesn't have decent liquidity, then one unexpected expense could severely hurt it," Schaefer said. 
 
Current ratio is expressed as current assets divided by current liabilities. It basically shows whether the assets that you can convert into cash quickly (within a year) will cover what you must pay off soon (in less than a year). A ratio of less than one means you could run short of cash

Help Your Clients Speed up Their Collections

Felix A. Addeo, CPA, Principal, Fazio, Mannuzza, Roche, Tankel, LaPilusa, LLC, shared with AccountingWEB his firm's unique "PROTECT" technique.

There's no single piece of advice that's suitable for every business or customer, so we encourage our clients to institute the following steps to PROTECT themselves from runaway receivables:
 
P = Policy should be established; don't let the customers set the terms.
 
R = Remind customers of the existing policy.
 
O = Obtain a reason for the payment delay. 
 
T = Terms for a payment plan should immediately be established.
 
E = Execute the plan.
 
C = Cease doing business with the customer.
 
T = Turn the receivable over to collections.
 
Lisa Giese and Mary Jo Richard, partners with Eide Bailly, share their advice to clients:
 
  • Communicate with the right person. If you are not getting a timely response from a customer, you may have to move upward. Reach out to a management-level employee, as this can sometimes speed up the collections process.
  • Bill timely. If it takes you a long time to get bills mailed then, more than likely, it will take a long time to get them back. Make sure you have an efficient and timely billing process in place.
  • Follow up. If you don't receive payment, it is important to follow up with your customers as part of your process. Revise your internal policies to include follow-up calls to customers after a certain number of days have passed. 
  • Protect your company. It is OK to have different billing procedures for customers, based on their payment performance. Establish credit limits; for slow payers, put them on a "Cash On Delivery Only" payment schedule. 
 
David M. Young, CPA, Lattimore Black Morgan & Cain, PC, suggests:
 
  • Know your clients and always listen so that you can stay in tune with their business. This allows you to be aware of a collection issue before it even arises.  
  • Invoice as work occurs so that you are billing more frequently and in smaller increments as opposed to one large bill.
 

 

within the next year unless you generate additional cash. But the metric has some limitations, Schaefer noted. "For example, by including inventory in the calculation, it may provide a distorted understanding of the company's very short-term cash flow," he said.

 
The second liquidity ratio is the quick ratio, which is typically expressed as cash plus accounts receivable divided by current liabilities. Again, the quick ratio may not be perfect for gauging liquidity, but it's a useful and popular metric to pair with the current ratio.
 
Accounts payable days and accounts receivable days. Accounts payable days and accounts receivable days are also key, Schaefer said. "Owners can discover that they may be paying their suppliers too quickly, which is money they could be investing instead of distributing immediately, or they could find they're not receiving payments quickly enough from their customers," he said. 
 
Accounts payable days is expressed as accounts payable divided by cost of goods sold multiplied by 365 days. What's a good accounts payable turnover ratio? It varies by industry, but generally, higher numbers are better.
 
Similarly, accounts receivable days is expressed as accounts receivable divided by sales multiplied by 365 days. Lower numbers are generally better. But this, too, will vary dramatically by industry. For example, some industries routinely give customers a thirty-day grace period for payments, especially those that bill for services, and other industries don't get paid until the entire job is complete. So construction companies, for example, have an average accounts receivable days ratio of more than sixty, compared with retailers' average accounts receivable days ratio of about twenty, according to data from Sageworks.
 
Because of this variation, Schaefer said, it's tough to make sense of financial ratios unless you find quality industry data against which to benchmark your company. What is a good net profit margin? What are sound liquidity ratios?
 
"Without comparing your own business to others, how will you know if an account receivable days of fifteen is great, average, or high?" he said.
 
Knowing how your metrics compare to other companies also helps you identify business areas that need fresh attention, Schaefer said.
 
Trade groups, surveys, and information providers are among the resources for finding benchmarking data. The important thing is to find businesses of a similar industry, revenue size, and geographical location.
 
"Business conditions can vary greatly between different areas of the nation, even if the companies are the same size and they make the same products," Schaefer said.
 
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