'Commingled Pools' vs. 'Mutual' Funds | AccountingWEB

'Commingled Pools' vs. 'Mutual' Funds

Many financial planners, and those helping administer retirement plans for clients and companies, may want to take a refresher course on the differences between 'commingled pools' and 'mutual' funds.

Mutual funds, of course, are very popular staples of 401(k) plans and other savings instruments, and although these funds and commingled pools are both run by investment managers, funds that are 'commingled' are not open to individual investors are not regulated by the Securites and Exchange Commission.

Most commingled pools are run by banks and trusts, and do not have the disclosure requirements more commonly associated with mutual funds. For this reason, they are becoming popular with investors because there is less pressure to make daily reports.

In addition, funds in commingled pools may cost less than the same stocks accumulated in mutual funds. This can be seen in the net investment return.

Wait, there's more!
There's always more at AccountingWEB. We're an active community of financial professionals and journalists who strive to bring you valuable content every day. If you'd like, let us know your interests and we'll send you a few articles every week either in taxation, practice excellence, or just our most popular stories from that week. It's free to sign up and to be a part of our community.
Premium content is currently locked

Editor's Choice

WHAT KIND OF FIRM ARE YOU?
As part of our continued effort to provide valuable resources and insight to our subscribers, we're conducting this brief survey to learn more about your personal experiences in the accounting profession. We will be giving away five $50 Amazon gift cards, and a $250 Amazon gift card to one lucky participant.
This is strictly for internal use and data will not be sold
or shared with any third parties.