10 Reasons (excuses) you're NOT blogging yet

Scott Ginsburg, aka "The Nametag Guy," was speaking recently at the St. Louis Business Expo, and a lot of people came up to him afterward with questions about blogging. Naturally, those questions came with a fair amount of reasons for NOT blogging. So, that inspired Ginsburg to write this list....

10 Reasons Why You're NOT Blogging Yet

1. You don't know how.
That's cool - you can learn the basics in about 20 minutes. Or you could read Naked Conversations and The Cluetrain Manifesto for a more philosophical approach.

The rest you'll figure out as you go along. Don't be stopped by not knowing how, or else you'll NEVER start.

2. You're scared of technology.
Oh, get over yourself. There are 50 million blogs already out there and 80,000 new blogs popping up every day! If your nine year-old daughter can do it, so can you. Don't be held hostage by the generation gap.

Suck it up. Education is the key. Just ask questions, poke around the blogosphere, and give it a try. You've got VERY little to lose.

3. You have writer's block.
There's no such thing as writer's block. Writing is an extension of thinking. You don't have writer's block, you have THINKER'S block.

So, try taking some time to just THINK, every single day. You'll be amazed at what you come up with.

4. You have no discipline.
According to Naked Conversations, 50 percent of most blogs are abandoned in the first few months. And why? Because people don't have the discipline to keep up with them.

 
10 Reasons (excuses) you're
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So, what's stopping you? Kids? School? Job? Time?

And are you coming up with a "good story" as to why you can't blog, or is it REALLY a valid reason?

REMEMBER: Leo Tolstoy had 13 kids when he wrote War & Peace. What's YOUR excuse?

5. You have no patience.
Here's the reality: Nobody is going to read, know about, care about, or even comment on your blog for at least 3-6 months. And that's if you post every single day.

SO: Are you willing to stick it out? Are you willing to not be validated for a long time?

Sure, it's a blow to your ego, but it will also grow your patience, stamina, and stick-to-it-ive-ness. And it will be worth it. (Eventually.) At the lowest common denominator, at least you'll have all those great posts and a LOT of practice.

6. You don't want put out unready or unfinished material.
That's understandable. The Perfection Trap is common for a LOT of writers. So, here's my suggestion: Post it unfinished. Let the world be your editor.

Sure, not everyone who comments or contributes will give you GOLD, but you never know. There are some smart folks out there. Especially if you position your post in a way that elicits comments, shared stories, and contributions.

Consider having a Call to Action at the end of each entry.

7. You think you have to be really insightful and profound.
Nope. I make a living writing about my observations of the world through the lens of WEARING A NAMETAG ;) Not exactly Shakespeare.

REMEMBER: Your everyday life is what people will relate to. You don't have to say anything big and profound.

8. You don't get it.
Writing is the basis of all wealth. Writing is the basis of all wealth. Writing is the basis of all wealth. Writing is the basis of all wealth. Writing is the basis of all wealth. Writing is the basis of all wealth. Writing is the basis of all wealth. Writing is the basis of all wealth. Writing is the basis of all wealth. (Got that?)

9. You are afraid to stick yourself out there.
Fine. Consider these three suggestions.

ONE: Channel your fear into your writing. Creativity is about being uncomfortable.

TWO: If you're scared that your stuff is too personal, consider blogging anonymously. That will give you a few small victories, which will boost your confidence. (Heck, I blogged anonymously for 6 months before I ever DARED to put my real name on anything!) And now, 5 years later, my blog is one of the Top 100 Business Blogs on the Web. Coincidence?

THREE: It's ironic, but the more personal your writing is, the more people will identify with it. And by "more people" I mean "higher numbers of people" AND "more identification."

10. You don't think anybody will read your stuff.
You're right. Nobody WILL read your stuff … IF YOU NEVER POST IT. Look, the Internet is a pretty big place. And there's a market for just about everything. So, just post anyway. You'll be amazed.

My philosophy is, "Whatever you have to say, there are probably 1,000 people somewhere on the Internet who agree with you."

About the author
Scott Ginsberg, aka "The Nametag Guy," is the author of seven books, an award-winning blogger, and the creator of NametagTV. He's the only person in the world who wears a nametag 24-7 and teaches businesspeople worldwide about approachability. For more info about books, speaking engagements or customized online training programs, call 314/256-1800 or e-mail scott@hellomynameisscott.com.

 

 

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