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Human Resources

Education & Careers

Employers use social networking sites to research employee candidates

Could your future boss be perusing your profile? Twenty-two percent of hiring managers said they use social networking sites to research job candidates, up from 11 percent in 2006, according to a nationwide survey of more than 3,100 employers from CareerBuilder.com. An additional 9 percent said they don't currently use social networking sites to screen potential employees, but plan to start.Of those hiring managers who have screened job candidates via social networking profiles, one-third (34 percent) reported they found content that caused them to dismiss the candidate from consideration.
Practice

From Boomers to Gen X and Y: How and what to communicate

By Phyllis Weiss HaserotThis is the start of a new series of regular columns by generational expert and internationally known consultant, coach, writer, and speaker Phyllis Weiss Haserot on intergenerational relations and navigating the challenges of the multi-generational workplace for better productivity, retention, succession planning, and business development results. Communication is a key sticking point, so we start with very specific tips to increase rapport and understanding.
A&A

Hiring essentials: Conducting background checks

By by Elizabeth MilitoWhen it comes to background checks, employers should be aware of the reasons for performing a background check, what basic information to request, and what legal boundaries exist to protect an employee's privacy.Why Conduct A Background Check?Federal and state law: Employers are legally required to conduct background checks for certain jobs. Depending on your company's industry, you may need to conduct background checks and may be prevented by statute from hiring employees convicted of particular offenses.
Education & Careers

Ninety-four percent of surveyed companies offer tuition reimbursements

As students gear up to go back to school this fall, those already in the workforce may want to consider continuing their education, a new survey suggests. Ninety-four percent of senior executives interviewed said their firms offer tuition benefits for their employees. Ninety-five percent of respondents said their companies also reimburse for other forms of professional development.The survey was developed by Accountemps, the world's first and largest staffing services firm specializing in accounting and finance.
Education & Careers

Times are tough all over: Survey shows employers and employees face problems

While many workers are having a tough time finding suitable employment in today's uncertain economy, companies also face challenges finding highly skilled people.
A&A

Effective rules for successful mentoring

Mentoring in general isn't a new concept, but for many firms, setting up a mentoring program is far down on the list of to-do's. Studies have shown that mentoring can be an effective workplace tool. Here are some tips for making the mentoring process a success.

The changing landscape of taking time off from work, and getting paid too

Taking time off from work, whether you're sick or just need some vacation time, is no longer a given.While many employees can call in sick and still get paid, even if a family member is ill and needs care, that's not true for all workers. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, about 43 percent of Americans get a smaller paycheck if they can't go to work due to illness. As a result, some workers are coming to work sick, exposing co-workers to contagious illnesses. The same is true for sick children, who must attend school because a parent can't afford unpaid time off.The U.S.

'Why doesn't your old resume work anymore?'

*** Please find the audio file at the bottom of this article ***If your last job search occurred prior to 2001, you may be in for a rude awakening. You might be surprised to find that your old resume, which worked well for you before, is no longer attracting employers, headhunters and corporate recruiters. If you wondered, “What am I doing wrong?” it might not be you—it’s probably your resume.There are three reasons your old resume may not be working for you:
Workplace Fitness

Economy is down but benefits remain stable

Despite recent challenges to the economy, employers are managing to maintain a balance in employee benefits, according to the 2008 Employee Benefits Survey released today by the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) at its 60th Annual Conference.
A&A

Daily habits for developing the art of leadership

Many people are born leaders, yet the ability to lead is actually an art and an amazing collection of skills which can be learned and sharpened. The following top ten daily habits will help you and/or your clients grow as a leader personally, professionally, and spiritually.

Supreme Court ruling makes it easier for employees to sue employers

Late in May, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of employees who claimed that they were retaliated against after complaining about workplace discrimination."This ruling increases the range of options for litigants to bring suits against their employers," said Steven Sheinberg, associate director of legal affairs at the Anti-Defamation League and member of the National Employment Lawyers Association.
A&A

Top 10 interview bloopers...and how to avoid them

We’ve all heard stories of job candidates who looked great on paper but who were absolute disasters in person. With fewer interview opportunities available in a competitive marketplace, it’s essential to make the best possible first impression. You can learn from the mistakes of others and avoid the top 10 worst interview blunders. Poor handshake.
A&A

Don't feel trapped in your job

By Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D. President, Discovery Surveys, Inc. - Only 54 percent of employees feel they have a good future with their current organization. Why do they feel this way?Some have doubts about the future of their organization. They fear that the company could go out of business, merge with another, or be acquired.More often they feel their performance is not valued.Ironically, our research also shows that most of these fearful employees will stay with their organizations anyway and continue to live in fear and unhappiness. Here's why they stay:

Workers change commuting styles in response to higher gas prices

Feeling pressure at the pump, many workers are changing their commuting habits to ease the financial burden of rising gas prices, a new survey conducted by Robert Half International shows.
Community News

Women of color in accounting feel lack of connection

Women of color in accounting, including African-American, Asian and Latina women, feel less included in the work environment than whites, are less likely than whites to perceive accountability in their firms' diversity practices, and believe that work-life practices at their firms lack racial sensitivity, a study sponsored by Catalyst has found. The study, Women of Color in Accounting, written by Katherine Giscombe is based on interviews with 1,424 respondents from the top 20 revenue-generating firms and is the second in Catalyst's Women of Color in Professional Services Series.
Practice Management

The real reasons employees leave, and how to keep the best

by Jim WelchWhy do people leave teams and organizations? The number one reason people leave jobs is because they fail to connect with their bosses as leaders and as people. People are rarely honest about why they leave a company. Too many associates that depart follow Jimmy Conway's advice (played by Robert DeNiro) in the 1990 hit movie "Goodfellas," who told Henry Hill (played by Ray Liotta), "Never rat on your friends and keep your mouth shut." There is no upside incentive for the employee to be open and honest. Think about it!
Practice Management

Staffing costs on the rise for U.S. private businesses

Among private businesses in the United States, 48 percent are paying significantly more in staff costs than a year ago, according to the Grant Thornton International Business Report (IBR). While this number is noteworthy, it is lower when compared to private companies across the globe, 63 percent of which are paying significantly more for staffing costs as compared to a year ago. In India, for example, 85 percent of employers report seeing a rise in labor costs. With a number of U.S.

Onsite health clinics and wellness centers provide health and savings

Some big-name companies are offering convenient, low-cost health care services in their offices and are cutting costs as a result.Pepsi Bottling Group, Florida Power and Light, Toyota, Sprint Nextel, and Credit Suisse, for example, offer onsite health services, which are proving to be cost-effective for the employers and employees alike. The clinics offer flu shots, check-ups, allergy shots, or maintenance programs for chronic diseases like asthma and diabetes.
Community News

Onsite day care makes mandatory Saturday workdays a family affair

Accountants know that mandatory Saturdays during tax season will be, well, taxing. But when you add small children to the mix, mandatory Saturdays can become a daycare nightmare. But not at Goldstein Schechter Koch. The Coral Gables, and Hollywood FL firm is offering working parents much needed relief and support in the form of complimentary daycare on Saturdays between January and April 15."Mandatory Saturdays are quite a challenge for families," said Goldstein Schechter Koch Director of Marketing Christine Suchyna.

Deloitte survey shows talent shortage is most pressing concern for employers

A shortage of skilled and talented workers has become the most pressing concern among employers, supplanting the perennial leading problem, rising cost of health care, according to the 14th annual Top Five Total Rewards Priorities survey conducted by Deloitte Consulting LLP and the International Society of Certified Employee Benefit Specialists (ISCEBS).Nearly three-quarters of the 413 U.S. human resources professionals surveyed cited talent as their top concern.

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