Articles by Bruce Katcher

Practice Development

7 Ways to keep marketing even when you're busy

Marketing when busy with client work is a challenge for both beginning and experienced professional service providers.
A&A

Seven ways to land new business by leveraging your client relationships

By Bruce Katcher, Ph.D.THE PROBLEM:Most professional service providers will tell you that their first clients were people they had worked with in the past who already had confidence in their skills and abilities. Many will also tell you that trying to sell to people they didn't know was much more difficult.The trick is to use the trust you have achieved with your clients to help you quickly establish credibility with new clients.Here are seven techniques for leveraging the faith that your clients have in you to land new business.
A&A

7 reasons why operating a home-based small business is advantageous to clients

By Bruce Katcher, Ph.D.THE PROBLEM:Many professional service providers seem embarrassed that they operate a small business out of their home. They are concerned prospects and clients will view this negatively. Although I personally don't go out of my way to advertise that I operate out of my home, I don't hide the fact either. I worked for four years for a large, international consulting firm with posh offices at a fancy address. I know from this experience that working as a small business from my home offers many advantages to my clients.
A&A

Do you have the right number of employees?

By Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D.Part 1 - THE PROBLEM:Organizations continue to downsize, yet our research shows that 6 out of 10 employees say there are not enough qualified employees to do the work in their department. Are they right, or are they lobbying to prevent layoffs? Here are some reasons why they may, indeed, be right:
Workplace Fitness

The returning-from-vacation blues

Four out of 10 employees feel their life is out of balance. Bruce Katcher, the founder of Discovery Surveys, shares tips for facing some work-related realities.It's the vacation season. Earlier this month I spent a week with a good friend at his lake house in Minnesota. He and his family spend two weeks there each year taking in the sun and wake boarding. During the last several days of the vacation, he kept saying, "I'm dreading going back to work." His job as a doctor at a large hospital is very demanding. In fact, he plans to retire in a year or so at the age of 53.
A&A

Don't feel trapped in your job

By Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D. President, Discovery Surveys, Inc. - Only 54 percent of employees feel they have a good future with their current organization. Why do they feel this way?Some have doubts about the future of their organization. They fear that the company could go out of business, merge with another, or be acquired.More often they feel their performance is not valued.Ironically, our research also shows that most of these fearful employees will stay with their organizations anyway and continue to live in fear and unhappiness. Here's why they stay:
A&A

Seven ways to avoid becoming a bad boss

By Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D. President, Discovery Surveys, Inc.Most employees experience a bad boss at least once in their career. Many feel they have never really had a good boss. Insensitivity, failure to communicate, and a lack of fairness are the hallmarks of poor supervision.Why is it that good supervisors are hard to find?Supervising is Not Easy Handling the complex issues of motivating employees and solving job and people-related problems is very difficult. Few are capable of handling these responsibilities well.
Community News

How do you Spell a Healthy Organization: R-E-S-P-E-C-T

By Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D. President, Discovery Surveys, Inc. - My work takes me to many different organizations. I can spot a healthy organization immediately. What I look for is the level of mutual respect.In unhealthy organizations: Management and employees talk negatively about each other behind their backs. Senior managers don't even bother to learn the names of employees. They also ignore employees when passing them in the hallways. 
Education & Careers

Don't Let Your Best Employees Jump Ship: What You Can Do

By Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D. President of The Discovery GroupTHE PROBLEM:The last few years have been very difficult for employees. They have experienced large scale layoffs, the outsourcing of their jobs, limited advancement opportunities, and low, if any, pay increases. In private, many have said to their colleagues, "When the economy turns around, I'm outta here." In fact, our research in 60 organizations over the past 10 years shows that 32 percent of employees claim that they plan to leave within the foreseeable future.
A&A

Is it time For You to Consider Self-Employment?

By Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D. President, Discovery Surveys, Inc. Job security has become an oxymoron. For our parents' generation, lifetime employment with a gold watch and comfortable pension at the end was not unusual. We're now living in a different environment. Seemingly everyday, companies merge, fail, and downsize. It is no wonder that so many employees are forced to update their resumes and hit the streets to find a new job.But these days many are saying to themselves:
Community News

How to Get Employees To Walk the Talk

By Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D. President, Discovery Surveys, Inc.It has become a cliché that "management must walk the talk" but so should employees.Our research shows that many employees don't understand how their work contributes to the organization's objectives. In short, they don't see the big picture. They don't recognize that no matter what their role in the organization, they can be contributing to its goals, vision, and brand.Is it no surprise that their behavior is, therefore, often inconsistent with the organization's vision?
Practice

Improving The Workplace: People Problems Perplex Management

By Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D. - Research shows that supervisors do a much better job of handling job-related problems than they do handling people-related problems. One of two employees believes that their immediate supervisor does a poor job of solving problems such as motivational, emotional, and personal issues.Here are some reasons why: Supervisors Become Supervisors Due to Their Job-Related SkillsEmployees are typically promoted to the supervisory level because of their technical or problem solving skills, not their people-management skills.
Community News

Five Sure-Fire Ways to Alienate Your Employees

By Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D. President, Discovery Surveys, Inc. - During the past decade, top management has done an excellent job of alienating employees. Their concern for people has taken a backseat to cost reduction, outsourcing of jobs, and a focus on short-term profits. And forget about training programs, promotions, or pay increases.As a result, many employees have said that once the economy turns around, they will be leaving for greener pastures.HOW TO ALIENATE YOUR EMPLOYEES
Practice Management

How Your Firm can Fully Utilize the Talent of Your Employees

By Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D. Close to 35 percent of employees feel that their job does not make good use of their skills. When employees aren't fully using their abilities, they are:- Unhappy; - Less productive; and - More likely to quit.When employees are underutilized, organizations suffer because they are not maximizing the results they can obtain from them. Management often contributes to the problem by:
Practice Management

Seven Ways to Motivate Employees

by Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D. President, Discovery Surveys, Inc.THE PROBLEM
Practice Management

Employees Lack Confidence in Management

By Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D., President DISCOVERY SURVEYS, INC.Employees need to feel confident that senior management is competently running the organization and has solid long-term plans for the future. Otherwise, there will be an erosion of employee: Motivation;Job performance; andCommitment to the organization.What can be done to build employee trust in management? 
Community News

Don't Let Your Best Employees Jump Ship: What You Can Do

By Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D. President of The Discovery GroupTHE PROBLEM:The last few years have been very difficult for employees. They have experienced large scale layoffs, the outsourcing of their jobs, limited advancement opportunities, and low, if any, pay increases. In private, many have said to their colleagues, "When the economy turns around, I'm outta here." In fact, our research in 60 organizations over the past 10 years shows that 32 percent of employees claim that they plan to leave within the foreseeable future.
Practice

Training is an Investment, Not an Expense

By Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D. President, Discovery Surveys, Inc.Organizations spend a huge portion of their operating budgets compensating employees. In return, they expect them to provide excellent products and services to their customers. Yet half of all employees say that they don't receive the training they need to do their job well.Why don't organizations provide the training their employees need? 
Practice

Organizations Must Innovate or Fade Away

By Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D. President of The Discovery GroupAccording to Benjamin Franklin, "Insanity is doing things over and over again and expecting different results." Many organizations offer the same types of products and services to the same types of customers in the same way year after year. And, then they wonder why: The competition can offer the same products and services at a lower price; Their once high value products and services are now viewed by customers as commodities;  
Practice Management

Don't Look Now, But Your Client's Problem is You

By Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D. President of The Discovery GroupTHE PROBLEMSenior management in most organizations have no idea what their clients are really thinking. They are insulated from the problems clients experience at the front lines of their company. Making matters worse is that in the interest of cost efficiency, organizations are establishing systems which mechanize rather humanize the customer/client experience.

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