Practice | AccountingWEB
by AccountingWeb on Nov 21, 2004
By Scott H. Cytron, ABC(Accounting Software 411) With the continuous fallout associated with failed audits, scandals and mishaps at the world’s largest accounting firms, it’s now a proven fact that more and more clients are leaving large firms in hopes of finding green pastures elsewhere.USA Today ran a story in late September, “More Firms Flee Big 4 Accountants”, that spoke to this very topic.
by AccountingWeb on Nov 16, 2004
Two independent warnings have been issued about Google's new Desktop Search tool, claiming it can pose security risks by caching confidential information, Internetnews.com reported. Google Desktop Search allows users to search documents, spreadsheets, e-mail, instant messages and Web pages that have been visited by that PC. To enable this, it creates cached versions of Web content -- which could include sensitive corporate information stored on servers and accessed via a Web interface, Internetnews.com reported.
by AccountingWeb on Nov 16, 2004
More than half of US employees said their boss is a referee instead of a coach, according to a recent survey by Development Dimensions International (DDI), a global human resource consulting firm. While a coach proactively helps employees before they are in a position to make a mistake, a referee boss waits for the mistake to call a penalty and tell the employee what they should have done instead.
by AccountingWeb on Nov 09, 2004
The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) has adopted new ethics rules that place new requirements on members who outsource work.Two new rules and one revised rule spell out the responsibilities AICPA members now must meet when outsourcing clients’ work to third-party providers.
by AccountingWeb on Nov 08, 2004
Why Successful Financial Managers Seek to Exploit Failure Rather Than Avoid It, by Bruce PounderIndividuals and organizations experience failure on a continual basis. Most failures are small, a few large, and a certain few catastrophic. Financial managers are quick to perceive the cost of failure, typically in the form of wasted money or lost opportunity. But many financial managers "fail" to recognize the significant value that is also present in nearly every failure.This article is about managing both the cost and value of failure in business today.
by AccountingWeb on Oct 31, 2004
By the Change Management Group To implement a successful CEO succession plan some critical steps should be followed to ensure a smooth transition to new leadership:Involve the Board of Directors. The board must not abdicate its responsibility or leave the decision to the incumbent CEO.Develop specific criteria for the new CEO. Directors must set criteria that are more than simply conceptual in nature. The criteria must be enough to distinguish one candidate from another.
by AccountingWeb on Oct 29, 2004
A majority of the nation's top 100 accounting firms surveyed view litigation support and its close counterparts, forensic accounting and fraud investigation, as leading areas of growth for their practices, according to March 2004 survey results released by Accounting Today magazine. That's why Margaret Grisdela, president and founder of Boca Raton-based Legal Expert Connections, is carving out an accounting niche within her general expert witness marketing practice to capture the market in its relative infancy. Ms.
by AccountingWeb on Oct 25, 2004
Compliments of bizmove.com - You've just been in a serious car accident. You've got massive internal injuries and a broken jaw. You're going to be in the hospital at least a month. Your jaw is wired shut so you can't use the phone. Will your business run easily and well while you recover? Will your customers be served while you are gone? If you've just experienced heart failure over this prospect, the following list is for you. The information below, if put into practice, will reduce your stress, increase your business' productivity, and give you the vacation you so richly deserve.
by AccountingWeb on Oct 19, 2004
“CPA firms have historically been a little slow in embracing technology,” said Jeff Horsley, CPA-Miller & Company.
by AccountingWeb on Oct 18, 2004
After placing last in American Lawyer's ranking of law firms based on a survey of attorneys who had not yet made partner, Clifford Chance asked its staff the reasons for their discontent. Almost all the reasons could easily apply to accounting as well as law firms. The key gripes:A 2,420 billable hour requirement. Associates felt they had to bill at least 2,420 hours a year in order to receive a bonus.
by AccountingWeb on Oct 18, 2004
By Bruce L. Katcher, Ph.D. - Research shows that supervisors do a much better job of handling job-related problems than they do handling people-related problems. One of two employees believes that their immediate supervisor does a poor job of solving problems such as motivational, emotional, and personal issues.Here are some reasons why: Supervisors Become Supervisors Due to Their Job-Related SkillsEmployees are typically promoted to the supervisory level because of their technical or problem solving skills, not their people-management skills.
by AccountingWeb on Oct 11, 2004
Fannie Mae critic Rep. Richard H. Baker (R-La.) released executive pay information last week at a hearing that has the mortgage finance company defending bonuses and perks.
by AccountingWeb on Oct 11, 2004
By Kerry L. Johnson, Ph.D. - Are you a peak performer? It seems as though every pro thinks they are the best. Nobody else can sell like them, or close like them. But yet, when I press them on exactly what it is that makes up a peak producer, they usually say, a strong positive mental attitude, goals and aspirations. It's shocking to see what little knowledge most salespeople have of what it takes to be a top producer. The Xerox Corporation recently conducted a study to learn what makes a top performer.
by AccountingWeb on Oct 07, 2004
Ernst & Young LLP has identified potential conflicts that may get in the way of the accounting firm's independence, a company spokesman said.
by AccountingWeb on Oct 07, 2004
The number of executives who don't want to be CEO has doubled since 2001 (60 percent today versus 27 percent in 2001), according to new research by global communications consultancy Burson-Marsteller. Only about one-third (35 percent) say they want to be CEO (versus 47 percent in 2001). The study was conducted among Fortune 1000 executives by WirthlinWorldwide.“Due to shortened CEO tenure and intense media scrutiny, executives are more wary of the corner office," said Patrick Ford, chair of Burson-Marsteller's Corporate/Financial Practice.

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