Frankenstorm Monopolizes (and Ruins) Halloween | AccountingWEB

Frankenstorm Monopolizes (and Ruins) Halloween

Just when you thought your Halloween would be occupied with applying zombie makeup and stuffing your desk drawer with chocolate bars, you get hit with a real nightmare, at least if you happen to live in the East or have family or clients who are affected by the storm. You can count on tax accountants to see through the tricking and bring us some treats in the way of reminders about casualty losses and accounting for property damage.

Meanwhile, the IRS is urging tax preparers to "beat the last-minute rush" and rrenew your 2013 PTIN NOW, before the digital queue gets so backed up that you have to wait and renew it, uh, LATER. Anyhoo, if you have $63 burning a hole in your pocket and 15 minutes to spare that you won't be able to find later, go ahead and get it over with. It's not like you can make this go away by waiting.





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Caleb Newquist is the Editor-in-Chief of Sift Media US, overseeing content for both AccountingWEB and Going Concern.

Prior to this role, Caleb served as the editor of Going Concern since its founding in 2009. During his time as editor, Going Concern quickly became one of the most popular and talked about websites in the accounting profession. He has been named one of Accounting Today's Top 100 Most Influential People every year since 2011 and has been published on numerous websites, including Above the Law, Deadspin, Denver Business Journal, and the Huffington Post.

Caleb is an adjunct professor of journalism the Community College of Denver in Denver, Colorado, where he teaches Internet Media.

Prior to falling bass ackwards into the media business, Caleb spent over five years working in public accounting, with more than three of those years at KPMG. Caleb received a Master of Science in Accounting from Colorado State University and a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of Nebraska at Kearney.

Caleb spends a lot of time on a bicycle and reading, but never at the same time.

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