Three Attainable PR Goals Accounting Firms Can Set for 2014

This is the latest post from Scott Cytron. You can see more of his "PR Matters" posts here
 
Based on my history of breaking them moments after I’ve set them, I’m not a big proponent of setting New Year’s resolutions. However, I do think it’s a good idea to set goals instead. Whether you have an active public relations program or just want to dabble in PR a bit, here are three simple and attainable PR goals you can set for yourself and your firm/company in 2014.
 
1. Participate in LinkedIn at least twice a week: Accountants love LinkedIn because it’s seemingly a much more professional social media application and platform than Facebook, Twitter or most other social media applications. Yet, you won’t love it if you don’t participate in it on a regular basis. Start by ensuring your profile is completely updated and make sure it continues to be current, then try to connect with others to network, and participate in threads and conversations at least twice a week. I’m certain you’ll see results in no time. If you're still getting comfortable with LinkedIn, there are quite a few stories on AccountingWEB about using LinkedIn to grow your practice, including a two-part series by Mark Ginsberg.
 
2. Take a reporter to lunch: I’ve written about this before. Identify a reporter at your local daily or weekly business newspaper, call him/her up and offer to take the person to lunch. The goal here is to establish yourself as a content matter expert, but the reporter won’t know you are an expert until you demonstrate your knowledge. This can be done quite easily and in a non-boasting forum through a social meeting such as lunch. The next time the reporter is writing a story that concerns your field(s) of expertise, you’re very likely to get a call for a quote to put into the story.
 
3. Write, write, write: Even if don’t write on a regular basis, you still have something to say to either your own clients and customers, or to the public, perhaps. Focus on topics you are passionate about and write about them, then position your article either on your own website, in your client communications or, once you take the reporter to lunch, inside a local publication.
 
Remember, too, that it’s not necessarily what you write and where you get published, but what you do with the article afterwards in terms of using it to reach prospects and clients. There’s nothing wrong with tooting your horn as long as it doesn’t come across as self serving. All you need to do is send an email to your prospect and client list, include the headline and link, and talk about how you were recently featured in x publication.
 
What are some of your own firm/organization’s PR goals? Share them below so others can learn some best practices.
 
Happy New Year!

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