LinkedIn Tips Part 3: Your Status

By Mark Lee

Status updates are short messages that are typical of many social networking platforms. While posting updates on LinkedIn is similar to Facebook and Twitter, it's also different.
 
From your LinkedIn home page or your Edit My Profile page, you can change your status update as frequently as you like.
 
Some marketing-obsessed LinkedIn users advocate daily status updates, and some people post updates even more frequently. I'm not a fan of this approach, even though I write as someone who has been active on LinkedIn for years, with more than 2,600 connections, many of them UK-based accountants and tax advisers.
 
Who sees your status updates?
Your latest status update will be seen by anyone who looks at your profile.
 
Every time you update your status, the home page of all of your network connections is updated with your news. But don't get too caught up by this. It doesn't mean that all your connections will see all your status updates.
 
I regularly look at my LinkedIn home page, but reckon I'm in a minority. How often do you look at yours?
 
On my home page, I routinely choose to hide updates posted by certain people. They tend to be those I don't know well, who regularly post uninteresting updates, or who post too often for my taste. Once hidden, that's it. I rarely go back and make them visible again.
 
Your most recent status updates are also distributed to your network via e-mail when LinkedIn sends out updates – again, I don't know how many people read these updates. I have tailored mine using the Settings facility (see Part 1 of this series). 
 
Status updates to avoid
Many people make the mistake of posting overtly self-promotional status updates. I doubt these often have the desired impact.
 
This also is probably NOT the place to share Facebook-style frivolous updates of where you are, what you're doing, or what you've done.
 
As a start-up practice, you'll probably also want to avoid highlighting your relative inexperience. This is unlikely to be an attractive quality so far as prospective clients are concerned.
 
Avoid any reference to specific clients. Even if you're careful to avoid breaching confidences, your connections might worry that you might.
 
Finally, I encourage caution if you're inclined to follow any of the generic advice out there about what to post as status updates. Most such advice is quite simplistic, and few of the ideas will be helpful for start-up accountancy practices.
 
Status updates that could work for you
Make your updates professional and support the positive impression you're seeking to create as a start-up practice.
 
Try searching the profiles of other accountants and see what they're posting (if anything). You may be inspired to try something similar.
 
More specifically, quasi-promotional posts that also evidence your expertise, approach, and success may be useful. Here are a few ideas to get you started:
  • "Just back from a great new client meeting with a local store owner. Delighted to have showed him some tax planning opps at first meeting."
  • "Today I'm setting up two new clients with a great online bookkeeping system that will help them (and me) keep on top of things."
  • "Attending an update course today with hundreds of other accountants. It's important to keep on top of recent tax changes."
 
As with Twitter, you want to make it easy for anyone who sees your status updates to recognize you as someone who can help them. Your status updates should echo and reinforce rather than contradict your profile and stated experiences.
 
You may also find that some of your connections are posting interesting status updates. You can click the Share link beneath any such update. This will copy it and make clear who posted it originally and that you're sharing it as one of your updates.
 
It's worth doing this with updates that may be of interest to your connections. It's good to share useful information and links on LinkedIn, just as it is on other social networks.
 
Your status update is limited to 140 characters  (just like on Twitter), so keep that in mind, particularly when cutting and pasting information you intend to share.
 
Commenting on others' status updates
Beyond sharing others' updates, you can alternatively simply Like them, add a comment, or send a message to the person who posted them.
 
It's a good idea to add thoughtful comments to the status updates of people in your network. You can do this simply by thanking them for sharing something you've found useful or perhaps by confirming their view or adding a further useful related insight.
 
Do be careful that your comment is helpful and positive. There's nothing to be gained by posting negative or controversial comments here (if anywhere).
 
A key tip
The amazing thing is, the more you help others on LinkedIn, the more they're likely to have a positive view of you and your new practice. This will ultimately be more beneficial than any blatant self-promotion could be.
 
Finally
For now, if you have questions, ideas, or views on anything above or in the earlier articles in this series, by all means, connect with me on LinkedIn.
 
Also by Mark:
About the author:
Mark Lee is consultant practice editor of AccountingWEB UK and writes the BookMarkLee blog for accountants who want to overcome the stereotype of the boring accountant – in practice, online, and in life. He is also chairman of the Tax Advice Network of independent tax experts.
 

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