How's Your 'Other' Audience?

By Jack LaRue

You're excited! Stoked! Charged! Geeked! You're about to launch a new marketing campaign or sales offering and you really like it. You've tested it on a couple of prospects, maybe some current customers, and it's resonating really well. You think you've hit a home run.
 
Before you crack open the champagne, you need to think about how the campaign will be received by your other audience: your staff. While they may not buy your products, it's very important they understand and buy into your marketing efforts.
 
Often, your staff will be taking your message to your customers and your prospects. And they're almost certainly the ones who will be delivering (or not delivering) on the promises that your marketing campaign makes. So you'll want to take some concrete steps to make sure they get it. 
 
For example:
 
Explain why you're launching the campaign. Go into specifics about what you're trying to sell and what you expect the results to be. If possible, keep your team updated on its progress. This can do a lot to encourage buy in and make your staff feel like they have a stake in the outcome.
 
Explain how the campaign benefits your staff. If you have a dedicated sales team, a good marketing campaign is just about the best tool they could hope for. It makes their job easier by giving them a prepackaged and well thought out way to talk about your company with customers. But you need to make sure they understand the message, and make sure their sales pitch works in tandem with it.
 
Explain the messaging. A good marketing campaign shouldn't require a great deal of explanation. Still, you want to make absolutely sure that everyone on your staff has a detailed understanding of your campaign's messaging. The better they understand the promises that are being made, the better they'll be able to deliver on them.
 
Use the campaign messaging in your own office. Put some brochures around. Put a copy of the print ad in the break room. Use the radio spot as your on-hold music. These are great ways to get more mileage out of the campaign by repurposing it. It will build morale and remind your employees of the need to deliver on the campaign's promises day in and day out.
 
If your sales team or staff isn't enthusiastic about your new offering, it can put a damper on the how the message is received. But excitement is contagious. And if you take the time to build enthusiasm and buy in among your staff and your sales team, you'll greatly improve the odds of hitting a home run.
 
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About the author:
Jack LaRue is the senior vice president, myPay Solutions, at Thomson Reuters Tax & Accounting.

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