Fifteen-Year Prison Sentence for Tax Fraud

Gino Carlucci was sentenced to 188 months in prison for his role in conspiracies to commit money laundering and to defraud the IRS as well as for filing a false income tax return, the Justice Department and the IRS announced on August 17, 2012. 

On July 25, 2011, a federal jury in Phoenix convicted Carlucci of both conspiracies and the tax crime after an eight-day trial. The following day, ABC 15.com, Everything Arizona reported, "Prosecutors said Carlucci and Mounts' false schemes included a purported investment in a fraudulent casino project in Antigua."
 
According to the evidence presented at trial, Carlucci and his codefendant, Wayne Mounts, stole large sums of money and assets from Joseph Flickinger, a tax return preparer in Ohio, who had himself defrauded multiple clients of their life savings in a fraudulent investment scheme. 
 
Flickinger pleaded guilty to federal charges in a separate case and was sentenced to seventy months in prison. After defrauding Flickinger of the money, Carlucci and Mounts devised a scheme to have Flickinger arrested by federal officials, and they then used the money for their own personal benefit.
 

IRS Statement

"Today, Mr. Carlucci was held accountable for his criminal behavior. He's nothing more than a con man motivated by greed. His sentencing is a victory for honest taxpaying citizens."

- IRS, Criminal Investigation Chief Richard Weber
 
Visit the IRS website page - "Examples of Money Laundering Investigations - Fiscal Year 2012" - to read about additional cases.
 
In addition to money, Carlucci and Mounts defrauded Flickinger out of several high-end vehicles and a condo near Lake Erie, Ohio, which they quickly sold for $210,000. Carlucci had some of the funds transferred into bank accounts held in the name of his wife and father-in-law. 
 
Carlucci's wife and Mounts withdrew more than $300,000 in cash over several months in increments of $10,000 or less so that they could avoid having the bank report their withdrawals to authorities. Carlucci and Mounts spent an additional $150,000 of the funds to buy a forty-three-foot luxury boat, the existence of which Carlucci concealed from the government for over two years.
 
Chief Judge Kathryn H. Vratil of the US District Court for the District of Kansas, sitting in Phoenix by special designation, ordered Carlucci to pay $893,716 in restitution to the victims in Flickinger's case and to the IRS. Judge Vratil further entered a forfeiture order against Carlucci for a money judgment in the amount of $722,841.00.
 
After trial, the government seized many of Carlucci's remaining assets that he was hiding, including another thirty-nine-foot boat, a Chevrolet truck, two Sea Doo personal watercraft vehicles, trailers, three all-terrain vehicles, and two vitamin encapsulation machines that he used for one of his businesses. 
 
Mounts was sentenced in January 2012 to sixty-three months in prison.
 

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